My Impressions of RSA 2019

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What staggered me more than the products and services were the hackneyed and trite methods for seducing tradeshow passersby; the food, toys, barkers, tchotchkes, crap, celebrities, clothes, stickers, pins, bric-a-brac, come-ons, and flat-out bribes were overwhelming and underwhelming at the same time. There must (MUST) be a better way to get information out to the people who need and want it.

My favorite booth? Two people sitting at an empty desk, with no posters, background, or other frippery. I got their marketing info and card, and will post the name of the company when I get it out of my luggage.

…follow up…this was the company I was talking about: https://www.openiam.com/

I don’t know what they do. I don’t know if their product/service is any good. But I appreciated the approach enough that I’m going to find out.

HIPAA or Giraffe?

            When we (in the INFOSEC community) think of HIPAA, we usually think of the security implications and requirements. That’s our perspective, and what’s important to us, as practitioners. The law, on the other hand, has very little to with security-- most of the security-related content is wedged into the law’s Section 264, which basically tasks the head of the US Health and Human Services Administration to go figure out what protections should be put on medical information for individual patients. When the law is copied from the Web to MSWord, Section 264 comes to about a page of text, while the entire law is 178 pages.

You can find it here:

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/PLAW-104publ191/html/PLAW-104publ191.htm

 

            The weird thing, from where I sit, is that this law, which is purported to enhance the security of patient data, does pretty much the opposite. The law encourages (just short of a mandate) putting all American medical data into an electronic format, according to a template that the law also tasks the federal government with creating. My question: what is more secure-- paper records or electronic records?

 

            - Paper records can be stolen, modified, or destroyed, assuming an attacker gain get physical access to them. Major or minor disasters, such as fire and flood, could likewise destroy/damage physical records. However, copying these records, or modifying them in a quasi-undetectable way, is a cumbersome, time-consuming process: the attacker would have to capture the data with the use of a device (a camera or photocopier), usually page-by-page, and typically with a light source present. Even stealing paper records is somewhat difficult: paper files are fairly heavy, and quite unwieldy...stealing the records of, say, 1,000 patients (if each record is 100 pages long, which is actually a fairly small patient record), would be impossible for a single attacker, without using a tool like a forklift or handcart, and making several trips between where the records are stored and where the attacker wants to transport them (say, a vehicle).

 

            - Electronic records are easy to steal in bulk: a file or a thousand files or a million files can be moved, erased, copied without much difference in effort (granted, there may be a considerable difference in the time required to copy a million files and a single file, but compared to the time it would take to copy a million hardcopy files, this duration is negligible). Modifying a single file, or a hundred files, or a thousand, through the use of an automated script, in an otherwise-undetectable manner, would be much easier than trying to physically change a paper record. And electronic theft/destruction/modification can be done remotely: the attacker never needs to have physical access to the data in order to harm it. Electronic media (drives, tapes, etc.) are still susceptible to physical disasters like fire and flooding.

 

            With that said, an electronic record can be duplicated easily for archival (the same quality that makes it easy to steal also makes it easy to make backups in order to multiple copies that might be stored in different locations, and thus survive a disaster). An electronic record can be readily encrypted/decrypted by the owner; this would be just about impossible to do with paper records, in any reasonable way. And electronic data store, and each individual file, can be subject to logging and monitoring in a way that is impossible for hardcopy: a piece of paper cannot tell its owner how many eyeballs have seen it.

 

            I’m not really sure the answer to every security issue is “put it on a computer.” Conversely, I’m not a Luddite, either: I don’t think we should stick to archaic modes of data processing and communication just to avoid security issues.

            However, I think this law is a perfect example of how attempting to codify security through a given practice/measure can, instead, harm that very same goal. I don’t think there was much of a market for ransoming patient data before HIPAA, and I don’t think hospitals and doctors had much of an IT security budget before data was converted to electronic form (which, again, is not always the best policy: the 414s hacking crew demonstrated all the way back in the 1980s that medical equipment/services could be harmed remotely). But there are also unintended consequences of efforts such as the HIPAA legislation; one of these is that the cost of medical care in the United States continues to escalate, and the cost of compliance for laws such as this make it harder for new, innovative, small providers to enter the market and compete.

            So was this law useful for patients? Or did it harm them -from both a security perspective and access to healthcare- overall?

            I don’t have much info about it. Glad to hear whatever anyone else has to contribute, in the comments or in private messages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wandering Security

For the first time ever, I ran across a hotel business center (desktop PC and printer) that had the USB ports physically blocked out. I find that interesting only because I’ve often considered how easy it would be to introduce malware/whatever into a business center (and often hoped those machines are airgapped from the hotel’s production environment).

Of course, this was at a time when I needed to print something off a USB stick, instead of, say, an email I could access through a Web browser.

I found out that unplugging the keyboard would, yes, open a viable USB port that wasn’t limited to just human interface devices. Sure, I was limited to inputs from the mouse in order to manipulate the file (because, well— no keyboard), but it seems that someone put at least some good thought into locking down that system, but then left a giant pathway right through their control policy.

Not sure what the workaround would be, short of putting Super Glue on all the keyboard/monitor USB connections for every PC in every property in that hotel chain. Or going with thin clients that have peripherals that are hardwired and not connected by USB (come to think of it, with a very limited target functionality, why does the business center need full PCs, anyway?).

Anyone ever given any thought to this?

Sharp Security

In the US, possession of a switchblade is a federal offense, but butterfly knives are as legal as rye bread.

In Germany, it’s just the opposite. About switchblades and butterfly knives, I mean— bread’s not illegal there, as far as I know.

Funny thing: neither place, far as I can tell, suffers from crime waves using either instrument.

I am sure someone smarter than me could figure out some sort of meaning in this.

Physical Badsec

If your physical security process involves controlled items, make sure you train your staff not to hand a stack of the controlled items to unauthorized personnel during the procedure...else someone could pilfer one or two, and use them for all sorts of nefarious purposes.

 

In totally unrelated news, if someone wants to smuggle contraband/small children/explosives aboard a cruise ship, drop me a line in the Comments section.

carnival luggage tag.jpg

Bad Control

The vendor has a policy: checks that are numbered less than 1500 are not accepted.

The clerk tells me to just ask my bank to put a higher number on my checks and send me some new ones.

The control was put in place years ago, to reduce the possibility of fraud from an outdated attack method (does anyone even commit check fraud anymore?). The vendor obviously knows the control is easy to overcome, and only actually prevents legitimate transactions.

This is not a good control.

First person to guess the vendor correctly gets a free copy, your choice, of one of my books. Put your guess in the Comments to this post.